Category Archives: Aboriginal

3 HORRENDOUS ANTI-INDIGENOUS LAWS

 

By First Peoples Worldwide

Much of the discrimination that Indigenous Peoples face is societal and economic, such as personal racism, discriminatory hiring practices, a misunderstanding of and disrespect for cultural practices, and lack of proper education opportunities, healthcare facilities, or legal oversight due to institutionalized bigotry. Much of this discrimination is written into laws – and many of these laws still exist or were terminated only a generation or so ago. Below are three examples of discrimination laws from Africa, Australia and North America. It is by no means a comprehensive list. If you have an example of a law you would like to share, please leave it in a comment at the bottom of this post.

 1. It was legal to hunt San (Bushmen) in southern Africa until 1936. When Dutch settlers arrived at the Cape of Good Hope (South Africa) they eradicated most of the local San population within 150 years, shooting and killing thousands and forcing more into labor.  From the 1600s-1800s, commandos (mobile paramilitary units) were ordered to hunt San tribes, whom the Dutch settlers feared and greatly misunderstood. By 1873, the San of the Cape were hunted into extinction, with other groups of San in the area surviving under constant threat. When the British claimed the land at the end of the 18th century, they vowed to end the violence by encouraging the San to become more “civilized” – primarily, by adopting an agricultural lifestyle. When this failed to work (shockingly to the British, the San, the oldest people on earth, were not keen on giving up their semi-nomadic pastoralist or hunter-gatherer lifestyle), British policy became much harsher and more violent. The killing of San was accepted and encouraged – the last permit to hunt San was issued in Namibia by the South African government in 1936. Understandably, concrete information on this practice is difficult to find – while some sources argue that San hunting only occurred in Namibia from 1912-1915, other sources purport that the practice lingered until the 1970s. Furthermore, South Africa, Namibia, Angola, and Botswana all had shoot-to-kill policies that allowed officials to kill San that believed may be hunting wildlife.

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https://www.culturalsurvival.org/news/3-horrendous-anti-indigenous-laws

ABORIGINAL PEOPLE HAVE A RIGHT TO PROTEST THE COMMONWEALTH GAMES AS STOLEN WEALTH

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Photo: John Pilger

From johnpilger.com

Australia has always wanted to stake a claim on Aboriginal culture – but only when it benefits them. They remain ignorant when the legislative bullets are fired to weaken and destroy it, and do not seek to protect it when the right to culture and ceremony is in the way of profit and white prosperity.

But when we need to show ourselves to the world, when we need to present a different face, it is Aboriginal culture that is seen as the antidote to the cultural cringe.

Suddenly, Australia is proud of the 100,000 years of human habitation that colonialism sought to wipe out, and which Australia devalues. Suddenly, it is “ours”, and one for which we all hold a shared pride.

As Patrick Wolfe wrote: “In Australia, the erasure of Indigeneity conflicts with the assertion of settler-nationalism. On the one hand, settler society required the practical elimination of natives in order to establish itself on their territory. On the symbolic level, however, settler society subsequently sought to recuperate Indigeneity in order to express its difference – and, accordingly, its independence – from the mother country”.

The Commonwealth Games Opening Ceremony was a reminder of this. The highlight of the night was the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander elements, from the traditional smoking ceremony by Luther Cora, to the Bangarra Dance Theatre and the Torres Strait Islander hip hop artist Mau Power.

No doubt, the First Nations people who took part should be celebrated because their performances, despite occurring inside the arena, represented acts of resistance and defiance – a display of survival in a state that was one of the largest killing fields in the nation.

But it is deeply ironic that while the Aboriginal flag was being lifted, and broadcast across the world, right outside the arena, Aboriginal protestors were being arrested, their own flags dragging along the ground.

SBS journalist Stefan Armbruster, one of our allies and the few to be outside reporting on the protests, reported that three Aboriginal activists – Dylan Voller, Ruby Wharton and Meg Rodaughan – were detained by police outside the stadium.

All of them were part of a delegation to the Gold Coast, to protest the imperialism and colonialism of the ‘Stolenwealth’. They were continuing the legacy of previous resistance fighters, like the thousands who converged on Brisbane to protest under the draconian administration of Joh Bjelke-Petersen in 1982.

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http://johnpilger.com/articles/aboriginal-people-have-a-right-to-protest-the-commonwealth-games-as-stolen-wealth

Barbaric British Cruelties Unleashed on Australian Aboriginal People

Excerpt from John Pilger … shocking description of the cruelties the British settlers unleashed on the first peoples of Australian. These shameful histories have been hidden away from public view. Thanks to people like John Pilger they are being exposed.

Eddie Mabo, Indigenous Land Rights Advocate, 1936-1992.

Edward (Eddie) Koiki Mabo, was born on Mer (Murray) Island in 1936.
He was exiled from the Island when he was 16, and worked across northern Queensland and the Torres Strait.
He then settled in Townsville with his young family in 1962.
Eddie established Australia’s first black community school in 1973.
In 1982 Eddie Mabo and four other Islanders initiated legal action, claiming customary ownership of their lands on Mer Island.

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https://derwombat.net/2017/10/30/eddie-mabo-the-legend/

THE OLD GUV LEGENDS

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Edward (Eddie) Koiki Mabo, was born on Mer (Murray) Island in 1936.
He was exiled from the Island when he was 16, and worked across northern Queensland and the Torres Strait.
He then settled in Townsville with his young family in 1962.
Eddie established Australia’s first black community school in 1973.
In 1982 Eddie Mabo and four other Islanders initiated legal action, claiming customary ownership of their lands on Mer Island.
After being rejected in 1990, Eddie Mabo took the case to the High Court.
The High Court overturned terra nullius in Australia in 1992, but sadly Eddie Mabo died before the decision was handed down.
Following the desecration of Eddie Mabo’s grave in 1995, his body was re-interred on MerQueensland_State_Archives_2531_Murray_Island_court_house_and_people_1898
Murray Island Community 1898.
Read more via ‘Priceless’ Eddie Mabo self portrait held at AIATSIS – ABC News 

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